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13

An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Gui), Early Western Zhou dynasty | 西周初 旅簋

Estimate:

100,000

to
- 150,000 USD

Important Archaic Bronzes from the MacLean Collection

An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Gui), Early Western Zhou dynasty | 西周初 旅簋

An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Gui), Early Western Zhou dynasty | 西周初 旅簋

Estimate:

100,000

to
- 150,000 USD

Lot sold:

100,800

USD

An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Gui)

Early Western Zhou dynasty

西周初 旅簋


the deep rounded sides finely cast with a wide register of repeating leiwen diamond ground, each unit centered by a protruding boss, below a narrow band of serpents interrupted by mythical beast-masks in high relief and an everted rim, the body set with a pair of loop handles issuing from beast masks and with pendent hooks, the tall, slightly splayed foot with a further band of serpents, the interior cast with an inscription translating to 'Lü made this precious sacrificial vessel for Father Yi'

銘文:

旅作父乙寶尊彝


Diameter 10⅛ in., 25.7 cm

A section of the rim (approx. 13x4 cm) has a restored break. A few very faint cracks to the handles. Otherwise in general good condition. X-Ray available upon request.


口沿一約13x4公分區域見損經修。雙耳見幾道極細微裂紋。除此外,整體品相良好。X光片可供索取。


For more information on and additional videos for this lot, please contact Randi.Yiu@sothebys.com.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.


我們很高興為您提供上述拍品狀況報告。由於敝公司非專業修復人員,在此敦促您徵詢其他專業修復人員,以獲得更詳盡、專業之報告。


準買家應該檢查每件拍品以確認其狀況,蘇富比所作的任何陳述均為主觀看法而非事實陳述。雖然本狀況報告或有針對某拍品之討論,但所有拍賣品均根據印於圖錄內之業務規則以拍賣時狀況出售。

Christie's New York, 18th September 1997, lot 323.


來源

紐約佳士得1997年9月18日,編號323

Richard A. Pegg and Zhang Lidong, The MacLean Collection: Chinese Ritual Bronzes, Chicago, 2010, pl. 18.


出版

彭銳查及張立東,《The MacLean Collection: Chinese Ritual Bronzes》,芝加哥,2010年,圖版18

The present gui is notable for its elaborate decoration, which combines both the 'diamond and boss' pattern and serpent motifs. While both designs were popular during the late Shang to early Western Zhou dynasty, a combination of the two is especially rare. Very few examples, which have been attributed to the early Western Zhou period, appear to be recorded. See a bronze gui raised on a square pedestal from the Palace Museum, Beijing, similarly decorated around the body with bosses on a diamond ground and bands of serpents encircling the foot and neck. The rubbing of the vessel is illustrated in Wu Zhenfeng, Shang Zhou qingtongqi mingwen ji tuxiang jicheng [Compendium of inscriptions and images of bronzes from Shang and Zhou dynasties], vol. 1, Shanghai, 2012, no. 04036. Another related example is the famous Hong gui in the Shanghai Museum, Shanghai. This remarkable vessel is supported on four legs and set with a pair of elephant handles. The body is similarly decorated with the 'diamond and boss' pattern and a narrow band of serpents around the neck; see Chen Peifen, Xia Shang Zhou qingtongqi yanjiu: Xi Zhou pian, shang [Study of archaic bronzes from Shang, Shang and Zhou dynasties: Western Zhou dynasty, vol. 1], Shanghai, 2004, pl. 231.


The first pictogram from the inscription on the present bronze identifies the owner of the vessel as Lü. An alternative interpretation of this pictogram considers it as a compound character reading Xing Lü. The history of the Lü clan can be traced to the Shang dynasty, as the same pictogram can be found on a few late Shang bronzes. See a gui from the Arthur M. Sackler Collection, now in the National Museum of Asian Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. (acc. no. S1987.51), published in Robert W. Bagley, Shang Ritual Bronzes in the Arthur M. Sackler Collections, Washington, D.C. and Cambridge, 1987, pl. 103; and a fangyi in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (acc. no. 1985.214.2), illustrated in Wu Zhenfeng, op. cit., vol. 24, no. 13465. The presence of the Lü family continued after the Shang empire was conquered by the Zhou, as the same clan symbol appears on several early Western Zhou bronzes, including a gui excavated in Fufeng county, Shaanxi in 1984, illustrated in Liu Yu and Lu Yan, eds, Jinchu Yin Zhou jinwen jilu [Compilation of recently discovered bronze inscriptions], vol. 2, Beijing, 2002, pl. 409; a you with an elongated body from the Pillsbury Collection, now in the Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis (acc. no. 50.46.97a,b), published in The Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Yinzhou jinwen jicheng [Compendium of Yin and Zhou bronze inscriptions], Beijing, 2007, no. 05090; and another you formerly in the C.T. Loo Collection, published in Wu Zhenfeng, op. cit., vol. 23, no. 12845.